Whether you’re looking at Katherine Ormerod’s impressive CV or her lively, always-updated¬†Instagram, it’s pretty clear why she’s called her latest venture Work Work Work. An online platform dedicated to showcasing women – and their lives – working across creative industries including fashion, beauty, design and art, it’s an instant hit of #inspo, with a generous dose of honesty. An “anti-perfectionism project which aims to reveal and explore the non-edited challenges that women face behind the fantasy of social media”, you’ll find women sharing on everything from stress and suicide to money and motherhood – strictly no holds barred.

Despite stints at everywhere from Grazia and Lyst to the Sunday Times Style, Ormerod herself has faced more than a few challenges along the way. One thing is clear though, she’s always, always worked. The result? For someone in her thirties, Katherine Ormerod is one pretty inspiring lady, if only to prove that motivation and tenacity will always pay off in the end. Fashion and journalism are two industries which are notoriously poorly paid and hard to break into, but Ormerod has carved her own path, based on talent, drive and – guess what – work, work, work. We found out more about a name you’ll definitely want to keep watching…

Motivation for me is all about…

I’ve always been really driven. I think there is an element of sheer ambition-I came from a modest background and was a scholarship kid and knew that I really wanted to achieve something different in life. In my twenties that meant career success and positions at respected publications. In my thirties it has meant freedom and financial security.

Success means…

Self respect, confidence and inner security. For me success is about resilience and knowing you can 100% rely on yourself.

I couldn’t have got there without…

Rejection, failure and disappointment. All have made me steely but also empathetic. The more you understand the human condition, the better you become at engaging and inspiring people – I’ve been fortunate enough to experience lots of ups and downs, catastrophes and triumphs just like everyone else. Lessons in humility have definitely helped me get to where I am today.

I was given a chance early on in my career by the then fashion editor at the Sunday Times Style, Sharon Ridoynauth and was supported through the worst time in my life by the team at Grazia – without other women like them I wouldn’t have made it through those tough few years at the beginning of my career. My parents have also been so instrumental – mum with her unfailing sunny-side up attitude and my dad’s constant encouragement for me to live the life I want and not be, ‘just another grey suit,’ as he puts it.

I always start my day with…

A firm psychological mentality. I want so desperately to snooze, but I don’t. I always get up when I planned to unless I’m at death’s door – the rest of the day is always better if you’re strict with yourself first thing.

When I don’t feel inspired I…

I think the key to inspiration is doing a lot of things and having multiple ‘jobs’. I edit a website, shoot imagery, work with brands across all sorts of content and strategy, interview new people every week and still do bits and bobs for press. A lack of inspiration for me only happens when I’m underemployed – any easy or repetitive work kills me and I have to have enough to sustain me for at least eight hours a day. Life has to be pacey and dynamic or I can become very dejected very quickly. I think it goes back to success – being busy is actually something I need to feel successful.

The landscape for women in business today looks like…

I’ve been incredibly sheltered my entire life from any form of gender prejudice or any idea that I couldn’t achieve whatever I wanted. I went to a selective all girls school on scholarship and financial aid from my dad’s company and our teachers were resolute feminists who believed they were moulding the next generation of industry leaders. My mum runs her own business and I’ve only worked in fashion which is so disproportionately female and bolshy you can struggle to imagine anything holding you back.

The past political year has obviously smashed my naivety apart and I can really see that women still have a huge way to go in business starting with maternity and childcare and ending in equal pay and far wider representation at the highest echelons. On the flipside, I really feel my generation of women in business are incredibly supportive, we share our struggles and feel a huge amount of common ground. It sounds trite, but the truth is we’re stronger together and the unity I’ve experienced during my career suggests women as a force in business will soon be unbeatable.

The trait I most deplore in others is…

Selfishness and entitlement. You see it a lot in the fashion industry and it makes my toes curl. I do really believe in karma, so ultimately I feel sorry for people who don’t have the ability to respect others, but it still gets my goat! Be on time, apologise for your mistakes and do what you say you’re going to do. Courtesy and kindness should also come as standard.

I’d like to be remembered for…

Having something to say! It’s so easy to get lost in the visual side of fashion and social media, but I really want to encourage all women to stand for something – whatever it is, use your voice.

What makes me happiest is…

A completed to-do list. It’s currently something I fantasise about.

Can I run in heels?

I’m 5’4″- I could give Usain a run for his medals in my stilettos.

You can check out Work Work Work online here, and follow Katherine Ormerod on Instagram here.